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East Africa's policy and stakeholder integration of informal operators in electric mobility transitions : Kigali, Nairobi, Kisumu and Dar es Salaam

  • Electric mobility is beginning to enter East African cities. This paper aims to investigate what policy-level solutions and stakeholder constellations are established in the context of electric mobility (e-mobility) in Dar es Salaam, Kigali, Kisumu and Nairobi and in which ways they attempt to tackle the implementation of electric mobility solutions. The study employs two key methods including content analysis of policy and programmatic documents and interviews based on a purposive sampling approach with stakeholders involved in mobility transitions. The study findings point out that in spite of the growing number of policies (specifically in Rwanda and Kenya) and on-the-ground developments, a set of financial and technical barriersElectric mobility is beginning to enter East African cities. This paper aims to investigate what policy-level solutions and stakeholder constellations are established in the context of electric mobility (e-mobility) in Dar es Salaam, Kigali, Kisumu and Nairobi and in which ways they attempt to tackle the implementation of electric mobility solutions. The study employs two key methods including content analysis of policy and programmatic documents and interviews based on a purposive sampling approach with stakeholders involved in mobility transitions. The study findings point out that in spite of the growing number of policies (specifically in Rwanda and Kenya) and on-the-ground developments, a set of financial and technical barriers persists. These include high upfront investment costs in vehicles and infrastructure, as well as perceived lack of competitiveness with fossil fuel vehicles that constrain the uptake of e-mobility initiatives. The study further indicates that transport operators and their representative associations are less recognized as major players in the transition, far behind new e-mobility players (start-ups) and public authorities. This study concludes by identifying current gaps that need to be tackled by policymakers and stakeholders in order to implement inclusive electric mobility in East African cities, considering modalities that include transport providers and address their financial constraints.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Document Type:Peer-Reviewed Article
Author:Jakub Galuszka, Alphonse Nkurunziza, Emilie Martin, Judith Achieng' Oginga, Jacqueline Senyagwa, Edmund Teko, Oliver Lah
URN (citable link):https://nbn-resolving.org/urn:nbn:de:bsz:wup4-opus-76953
Year of Publication:2021
Language:English
Source Title (English):Sustainability
DOI:https://doi.org/10.3390/su13041703
Volume:13
Issue:4
Divisions:Energie-, Verkehrs- und Klimapolitik
Dewey Decimal Classification:380 Handel, Kommunikation, Verkehr
OpenAIRE:OpenAIRE
Licence:License LogoCreative Commons - CC BY - Namensnennung 4.0 International