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Conflicting perspectives on urban landscape quality in six urban regions in Europe and their implications for urban transitions

  • The European Landscape Convention urges countries to involve stakeholders including citizens in the governance of ordinary (urban) landscapes. This paper studies conflicting stakeholder perspectives on urban landscape quality in the context of urban sustainability transitions in six European urban regions in the Netherlands, Italy, France, Croatia, Belarus and the Russian Federation. Repertory grid technique helped to identify the dimensions through which persons evaluate urban landscape quality. Ninety-three (93) interviewees elicited 1400 bipolar constructs, such as "Edible green - Concrete" or "Community, group - Loneliness". They then selected two constructs they consider most relevant in the context of urban sustainability transitions,The European Landscape Convention urges countries to involve stakeholders including citizens in the governance of ordinary (urban) landscapes. This paper studies conflicting stakeholder perspectives on urban landscape quality in the context of urban sustainability transitions in six European urban regions in the Netherlands, Italy, France, Croatia, Belarus and the Russian Federation. Repertory grid technique helped to identify the dimensions through which persons evaluate urban landscape quality. Ninety-three (93) interviewees elicited 1400 bipolar constructs, such as "Edible green - Concrete" or "Community, group - Loneliness". They then selected two constructs they consider most relevant in the context of urban sustainability transitions, and ranked all pictures on a 10-points scale. The rankings were analyzed using Multiple Correspondence Analysis. We find that, in spite of the many social and cultural differences between the regions, stakeholders largely agree on the preferred direction of urban transitions; more green and blue spots where people can meet and undertake joint (leisure) activities. The main conflict is between, on the one hand, a preference for organized development and beautification and, on the other hand, naturalness (permeability of soil) and organic development. The paper considers several challenges for transition governance.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Document Type:Peer-Reviewed Article
Author:Matthijs Hisschemöller, Viktar Kireyeu, Tara Freude, Florian Guerin, Olga Likhacheva, Ilenia Pierantoni, Ana Sopina, Timo von Wirth, Bojana Bojanic Obad Scitaroci, Francois Mancebo, Massimo Sargolini, Anton Shkaruba
URN (citable link):https://nbn-resolving.org/urn:nbn:de:bsz:wup4-opus-80663
DOI (citable link):https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cities.2022.104021
Year of Publication:2022
Language:English
Source Title (English):Cities
Volume:131
Article Number:104021
Divisions:Nachhaltiges Produzieren und Konsumieren
Dewey Decimal Classification:300 Sozialwissenschaften
OpenAIRE:OpenAIRE
Licence:License LogoCreative Commons - CC BY - Namensnennung 4.0 International