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Energy sufficiency policy : an evolution of energy efficiency policy or radically new approaches?

  • In the last four decades, energy efficiency increased significantly in OECD countries. However, only during the most recent years, total energy consumption started to decrease a little, and much more slowly than energy efficiency potentials would suggest. Energy sufficiency has therefore gained new attention as a way to limit and reduce total energy consumption of a household or a country overall. The project "Energiesuffizienz" funded by the German ministry for research has examined what energy sufficiency actually is, and what householders, household members but also manufacturers and local authorities could do to make electricity use in the home more sufficient. The focus of this paper is the policy part of the project - the firstIn the last four decades, energy efficiency increased significantly in OECD countries. However, only during the most recent years, total energy consumption started to decrease a little, and much more slowly than energy efficiency potentials would suggest. Energy sufficiency has therefore gained new attention as a way to limit and reduce total energy consumption of a household or a country overall. The project "Energiesuffizienz" funded by the German ministry for research has examined what energy sufficiency actually is, and what householders, household members but also manufacturers and local authorities could do to make electricity use in the home more sufficient. The focus of this paper is the policy part of the project - the first comprehensive analysis of an energy sufficiency policy. The objective is to find out how policy can support market actors in using the energy sufficiency options identified. As for energy efficiency policy, it starts with the gathering of potential sufficiency actions and the analysis of the relevant barriers all market actors face, to derive recommendations for which policy instruments need to be combined to an effective policy package, and which other pre-conditions have to be met. Energy efficiency and energy sufficiency should not be seen as opposed to each other but work in the same direction - saving energy. Therefore, some instruments of the energy sufficiency policy package may be the same as for energy efficiency - such as energy taxation, and linear or progressive energy prices. Some may simply adapt technology-specific energy efficiency policy instruments. Examples are progressive appliance efficiency standards, standards based on absolute consumption, or providing energy advice. However, sufficiency may also require radical new approaches particularly to mitigate the drivers of non-sufficiency. They may range from promotion of completely different services for food and clothes cleaning, to instruments for limiting average dwelling floor area per person, or to a cap-and-trade system for the total electricity sales of a supplier to its customers, instead of an energy efficiency obligation. The paper presents these and other elements of an integrated energy sufficiency policy package resulting from this analysis.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Document Type:Conference Object
Author:Stefan ThomasORCiDGND, Lars-Arvid Brischke, Johannes Thema, Michael Kopatz
URN (citable link):https://nbn-resolving.org/urn:nbn:de:bsz:wup4-opus-59222
Editor:Therese Laitinen Lindström
Publisher:Europ. Council for an Energy Efficient Economy
Place of Publication:Stockholm
Year of Publication:2015
Language:English
Source Title (English):First fuel now : ECEEE 2015 Summer Study ; 1-6 June 2015, Toulon/Hyères, France ; proceedings
First Page:59
Last Page:70
Release Date:2015/06/12
Division:Energie-, Verkehrs- und Klimapolitik
Dewey Decimal Classification:300 Sozialwissenschaften
Licence:License LogoIn Copyright - Urheberrechtlich geschützt