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Factors of change : the influence of policy environment factors on climate change mitigation strategies in the transport sector

  • There is a large potential for cost-effective solutions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to improve the sustainability of the transport sector that is yet unexploited. Considering the cost-effectiveness and the potential for co-benefits, it is hard to understand why energy gains and mitigation action in the transport sector is still lagging behind the potential. Particularly interesting is the fact that there is substantial difference among countries with relatively similar economic performances, such as the OECD countries in the development of their transport CO2 emission over the past thirty years despite the fact that these countries had relatively similar access to efficient technologies and vehicles. This study aims to apply someThere is a large potential for cost-effective solutions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to improve the sustainability of the transport sector that is yet unexploited. Considering the cost-effectiveness and the potential for co-benefits, it is hard to understand why energy gains and mitigation action in the transport sector is still lagging behind the potential. Particularly interesting is the fact that there is substantial difference among countries with relatively similar economic performances, such as the OECD countries in the development of their transport CO2 emission over the past thirty years despite the fact that these countries had relatively similar access to efficient technologies and vehicles. This study aims to apply some well established political science theories on the particular example of climate change mitigation in the transport sector in order to identify some of the factors that could help explain the variations in success of policies and strategies in this sector. The analysis suggests that institutional arrangements that contribute to consensus building in the political process provide a high level of political and policy stability which is vital to long-term changes in energy end-use sectors that rely on long-term investments. However, there is no direct correlation between institutional structures, e.g. corporatism and success in reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the transport sector. Environmental objectives need to be built into the consensus-based policy structure before actual policy progress can be observed. This usually takes longer in consensus democracies than in politically more agile majoritarian policy environments, but the policy stability that builds on corporatist institutional structures is likely to experience changes over a longer-term, in this case to a shift towards low-carbon transport that endures.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Document Type:Peer-Reviewed Article
Author:Oliver Lah
URN (citable link):https://nbn-resolving.org/urn:nbn:de:bsz:wup4-opus-67227
Year of Publication:2017
Language:English
Source Title (English):Transportation research procedia
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.trpro.2017.05.265
Volume:25
First Page:3499
Last Page:3514
Release Date:2017/06/16
Division:Energie-, Verkehrs- und Klimapolitik
Dewey Decimal Classification:320 Politik
OpenAIRE:OpenAIRE
Licence:License LogoCreative Commons - Namensnennung-Nicht kommerziell-Keine Bearbeitung