Volltext-Downloads (blau) und Frontdoor-Views (grau)

Automating behavior? : An experimental living lab study on the effect of smart home systems and traffic light feedback on heating energy consumption

  • In the face of growing popularity of eco-feedback innovations, recent studies draw attention to the relevance of the human factor for a more effective design of eco-feedback. This paper explores these challenges more deeply by employing a mixed methods approach. We provide in-situ insights from a Living Lab experiment on the effect of smart home systems and traffic light feedback on heating energy consumption in private households. Our results from an interrupted time series analysis of logged data on indoor room temperature, CO2 concentration and consumption of natural gas show that the interventions do not affect heating as expected, neither for automating behaviour via high-tech smart home systems nor via low-tech traffic light feedback.In the face of growing popularity of eco-feedback innovations, recent studies draw attention to the relevance of the human factor for a more effective design of eco-feedback. This paper explores these challenges more deeply by employing a mixed methods approach. We provide in-situ insights from a Living Lab experiment on the effect of smart home systems and traffic light feedback on heating energy consumption in private households. Our results from an interrupted time series analysis of logged data on indoor room temperature, CO2 concentration and consumption of natural gas show that the interventions do not affect heating as expected, neither for automating behaviour via high-tech smart home systems nor via low-tech traffic light feedback. Smart home systems do not promise a significant reduction of heating energy consumption and a traffic light feedback on indoor air quality does not lead to a reaction of indoor CO2 concentrations, but may reduce heating energy consumption. Qualitative interviews on heating practices of participants suggests that comfort temperatures, lack of competences and inert heating systems do override expected effects of the feedback interventions. We propose that high-tech smart home systems should carefully consider the handling competences of users. Low-tech feedback products on the other hand should by design stronger address user experience factors like comfort temperatures.show moreshow less

Download full text files

Export metadata

Additional Services

Share in Twitter    Search Google Scholar    frontdoor_oas
Metadaten
Document Type:Peer-Reviewed Article
Author:Johannes Buhl, Marco Hasselkuß, Paul Suski, Holger Berg
URN (citable link):https://nbn-resolving.org/urn:nbn:de:bsz:wup4-opus-67707
Year of Publication:2017
Language:English
Source Title (English):Current journal of applied science and technology
Volume:22
Issue:4
First Page:1
Last Page:18
Note:
Die Publikationsstrategien des Verlags Sciencedomain International werden öffentlich kontrovers diskutiert (Stichwort: Predatory Journals). Die Geschäftsleitung des Wuppertal Instituts hat daher im Juni 2018 entschieden - auch unabhängig von der bis dahin vom Institut praktizierten Einzelprüfung der Journals - nicht mehr in Zeitschriften dieses Verlags zu veröffentlichen.
Release Date:2017/08/07
Division:Nachhaltiges Produzieren und Konsumieren
Dewey Decimal Classification:600 Technik, Medizin, angewandte Wissenschaften
Licence:License LogoCreative Commons - Namensnennung